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This is a picture of one of our insured’s houses that is getting new shingles on the roof.

One of the reasons that home insurance has been going up for the last few years is because most insurance companies are losing money insuring homes. The problem arises from the situation where a hail storm goes through a community and a few houses have damage to their roof and now everyone on the block gets a new roof even if their roof was already worn out. The whole idea behind insurance is to try to replace what was lost in the event of a claim. If a worn out roof is replaced with a brand new roof then that isn’t really insurance. A big initiative for the insurance industry in general is to try to contain roof claims when the roof is already worn out. Many insurance companies are tracking the age of roofs and in some cases giving a discount for new roofs and in other cases charging extra for old roofs.

It is in your best interest to make sure we know if you put on a new roof.

Posted 5:00 PM

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